Black Cat, A bit of Cultural Lesson Part 1

An Inside Tip to get around easily in Japan

black-cat-flag

So imagine you have arrived at Narita Airport.

You have a huge ski bag. So heavy just even to go through the customs.

If I were you I wouldn’t be too excited about the journey ahead.

The idea of carrying that through a busy train station in Tokyo is so daunting…

Here’s a solution to lighten your head and (maybe) shoulder or arms.

BLACK CAT!

Or more precisely, Kuroneko Yamato クロネコヤマト

Here’s the link to Kuroneko Yamato English website for more detail.

What Is it?

This is basically the nation-wide scale delivery system offered by the company called Kuroneko Yamato.

It’s also known as Takkyubin 宅急便.

There are many other companies for Takkyubin in this country but by far this Kuroneko Yamato has got the furthest reach throughout the country from the top of the northern end to the southern end of the country.

Lots of friends around me who have visited Japan many times call this Black Cat, as you can simply see in their logo, so I may as well stick to that nickname.

How does it work?

Basically, you either bring your stuff to the place where they do accept drop off or ask them to come collect it.

Black Cat Kuroneko Yamato 1.jpg

Wherever you find this flag or their logo, that means these places do accept your drop off.

For example, majority of convenience stores through the country do accept drop offs.

The better way to maximise this system

Let’s say, you are going to somewhere for your ski holiday and you have the same accommodation booked already for 7 days.

If I were you, the first thing I would do is as soon as I get out to the arrival lounge at the airport I’ll go look for this logo.

I actually know exactly where they are at Narita Airport, that’s always right at the end of the building on the ground floor, the same level as you come out.

Then I walk to their counter, fill out the form, make a payment then done!

No Stress!

Then you are about to leave your accomodation at the end of your holiday, you should be able to ask someone at your accomodation to get in touch with a local delivery driver to come pick up your stuff.

Be aware that these company ask you to set up the pick up 2 days in advance if you want your stuff delivered to the airport.

This is because, as far as I understand, your luggage has to go through some sort of check before they get delivered to the depot inside the airport.

Their depot for your pick up is normally on the same floor as the departure lounge so you have no hassle dragging around inside the airport.

Well set up aye?

How much?

Basically the further the distance for delivery, the more expensive it gets.

The fare itself normally gets calculated by the total size of your luggage, in other words the total dimension of height, width and depth.

However, in my usual case, a ski bag (around 23 kg) normally incur an extra charge since they are longer and heavier.

But it still costs me only just over ¥2000!

What’s more about it is, it’s an overnight delivery!

If you want more out of them, they can actually deliver at the designated time that you want!

Far out!

Like these are still not good enough, if you are not present when they get delivered, the driver guy normally comes back later on the same day!

Japanese go far above and beyond when it comes to service, almost too much!

This post is getting quite long so I will tell you on another post as to what  you need to know to fill out the form.

Thanks for reading this far!

-Today’s Phrase-

Kuroneko Yamato No Takkyubin クロネコヤマトのたっきゅうびん = Kuroneko Yamato Delivery Service

Listen to nail this. this phrase sure will help you in Japan!

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